Mary and the Devil

Quaker minister Mary Kite was not like most Friends you may have heard of. Kite was born only a few months before well-known Quaker minister Lucretia Mott (Kite in late 1792, Mott at the start of 1793), and like Mott she was an outspoken woman who traveled widely to spread her message. However, in many ways the two were strikingly different. 

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Different Type of Activism: Chloe Cudsworth Littlefield, Private Duty Nurse

The following post was originally published in The Chronicle in Fall 2003. The Bates Center’s collections highlight the boundaries women as nurses crossed as well as the empowerment they created for themselves and for the profession. The basic idea of hiring nurses raised profound anxiety about class systems and private versus public spaces. Philadelphia’s nursing pioneers changed the idea of hiring nurses for quality care both at home and in hospitals. The history of nursing, and of healthcare, demonstrates the intersections of race, economics, and society, particularly in the decades leading to the ratification of the 19th Amendment. 

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The Correspondence of M. Carey Thomas and Mary Elizabeth Garrett

Bryn Mawr College digitized a portion of the M. Carey Thomas Papers for In Her Own Right, including letters to and from her companion Mary Elizabeth Garrett. They were progressive women who did important work, but they also held and expressed some problematic views.

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Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Training School: The Origins of Mercy-Douglass Hospital

On the evening of October 31st, 1895, an enthusiastic audience gathered at the Wesley A.M.E Zion Church for the opening ceremonies of the newly established Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Training School. While Philadelphia had a number of medical training schools, most refused to admit people of color. Being excluded from formal medical training, concerned community members gathered to find a way to train African Americans to be able to compete with others and find employment in the medical field. Read on to find out more about how Mercy Douglass Hospital came to be.

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Happy Native American Heritage Month!

As we close out the month of November, In Her Own Right would like to highlight some of the brilliant Native American women who became doctors through the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania: Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte and Dr. Lillie Rosa Minoka-Hill. After reading, search for “Womens Medical College of Pennsylvania” on our database site to learn more about the college and the women who attended.

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The Rise of the PCLA: Child Labor Reform in Pennsylvania

The women of In Her Own Right fought not only for their own rights, but also for the rights of those less fortunate. Through working with the Pennsylvania Child Labor Committee, Philadelphia-area women were able to lobby for better child labor legislation before they even had the right to vote.

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Dora Kelly Lewis: Philadelphia’s Voice in the Suffrage Movement

As the country commemorates the centenary of the Nineteenth Amendment, the In Her Own Right Project is highlighting collections related to women’s rights and the long struggle for women’s suffrage. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is home to the correspondence of Dora Kelly Lewis, a prominent Philadelphian and central figure of the suffrage movement.
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