Halloween Edition: Seances and Suffrage

In honor of Halloween, this week’s post takes a look at Spiritualism, a mid-nineteenth and early-twentieth century movement that aimed to establish communication between the living and the dead through spirit mediums.

Don’t forget to join us at the Free Library tonight to learn more about In Her Own Right and the suffrage movement!

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“There is No Such Thing as Bad Publicity” – Controversies at the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania

From 1867-1972, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMCP) compiled newspaper clippings scrapbooks, which covered topics relevant to the College, its Hospital (established in 1904), and women in medicine. The Drexel College of Medicine Legacy Center holds 27 of these scrapbook volumes; the first 8 volumes (1867-1920) are digitized for the In Her Own Right website. These scrapbooks uniquely capture the conflicting opinions on women in the medical profession.

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The Rise of the PCLA: Child Labor Reform in Pennsylvania

The women of In Her Own Right fought not only for their own rights, but also for the rights of those less fortunate. Through working with the Pennsylvania Child Labor Committee, Philadelphia-area women were able to lobby for better child labor legislation before they even had the right to vote.

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Labor Day Special: Philadelphia’s Shirtwaist Strike of 1909-1910

Happy Labor Day! Most people are familiar with the Uprising of 20,000 and the tragic New York Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. Did you know that Philadelphia had a similar fire that led to one of the first massive uprisings of women in the United States?

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Dora Kelly Lewis: Philadelphia’s Voice in the Suffrage Movement

As the country commemorates the centenary of the Nineteenth Amendment, the In Her Own Right Project is highlighting collections related to women’s rights and the long struggle for women’s suffrage. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is home to the correspondence of Dora Kelly Lewis, a prominent Philadelphian and central figure of the suffrage movement.
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Lucretia Mott: 19th Century Foodie

When I was hired to digitize collections for PACSCL’s In Her Own Right project, I was most excited to work with the Lucretia Mott papers. Mott (1793-1880) was a Quaker minister, abolitionist, social reformer, and one of the igniters of the women’s rights movement, and I was eager to learn more about her. One thing I did not expect was for Lucretia Mott to make me hungry. Though she was a tiny woman, she certainly enjoyed a good meal, and she often included the details of the fare she served or was served in her correspondence. She also touted her cooking skills, which her granddaughter Anna Davis Hallowell confirmed were excellent in the biography she wrote of her grandparents.
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One Hundred Years Later: Remembering the Ratification of the 19th Amendment in Pennsylvania

post by Jessica Markey Locklear, Graduate Assistant at Temple University’s Special Collections Research Center

One hundred years ago on this day in history, the state of Pennsylvania voted to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment to the constitution stating that, “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” Heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies, Pennsylvania has a historical reputation of being a front runner in advocating for national progressive social reform. What originally began as ecumenical campaigns against slavery in the early nineteenth century eventually evolved into a seventy year struggle for the woman’s right to vote. Continue reading “One Hundred Years Later: Remembering the Ratification of the 19th Amendment in Pennsylvania”