“There is No Such Thing as Bad Publicity” – Controversies at the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania

From 1867-1972, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMCP) compiled newspaper clippings scrapbooks, which covered topics relevant to the College, its Hospital (established in 1904), and women in medicine. The Drexel College of Medicine Legacy Center holds 27 of these scrapbook volumes; the first 8 volumes (1867-1920) are digitized for the In Her Own Right website. These scrapbooks uniquely capture the conflicting opinions on women in the medical profession.

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Labor Day Special: Philadelphia’s Shirtwaist Strike of 1909-1910

Happy Labor Day! Most people are familiar with the Uprising of 20,000 and the tragic New York Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. Did you know that Philadelphia had a similar fire that led to one of the first massive uprisings of women in the United States?

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Dora Kelly Lewis: Philadelphia’s Voice in the Suffrage Movement

As the country commemorates the centenary of the Nineteenth Amendment, the In Her Own Right Project is highlighting collections related to women’s rights and the long struggle for women’s suffrage. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania is home to the correspondence of Dora Kelly Lewis, a prominent Philadelphian and central figure of the suffrage movement.
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Lucretia Mott: 19th Century Foodie

When I was hired to digitize collections for PACSCL’s In Her Own Right project, I was most excited to work with the Lucretia Mott papers. Mott (1793-1880) was a Quaker minister, abolitionist, social reformer, and one of the igniters of the women’s rights movement, and I was eager to learn more about her. One thing I did not expect was for Lucretia Mott to make me hungry. Though she was a tiny woman, she certainly enjoyed a good meal, and she often included the details of the fare she served or was served in her correspondence. She also touted her cooking skills, which her granddaughter Anna Davis Hallowell confirmed were excellent in the biography she wrote of her grandparents.
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Deborah Norris Logan: Historian, Diarist, Republican

Happy Women’s History Month! We’re kicking off the celebration with this in-depth guest post introducing us to Deborah Norris Logan, an early American historian and prolific diarist. After reading, take a closer look at her diaries in the In Her Own Right database or the HSP catalog, and pay a visit to the museum in her beloved home, Stenton mansion, located in Historic Germantown, Philadelphia. Continue reading “Deborah Norris Logan: Historian, Diarist, Republican”

Contraband: Centering Black Agency in the Civil War

Popular narratives of the Civil War often suggest that white Northerners saved otherwise helpless African Americans from slavery. However, such portrayals are far from accurate; African Americans played a major role in the war effort and in advocating for emancipation. In honor of #BlackHistoryMonth, today we discuss “contrabands,” African American refugees who contributed to both developments.

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New Data for the New Year!

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The In Her Own Right project database, hosted at inherownright.org, is proud to present the fruits of our first harvest to the public. Our record count is now over 1000, but rest assured the focus is on quality over quantity. The new data includes photographs, letters, diaries, school records, and much more. Read a bit about each new collection below, and stay tuned–a website redesign is in our future!

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The Appeal of a Dying Mother: Society to Protect Children from Cruelty annual reports

This guest post highlights a women’s charitable organization that made some of the first strides toward protecting children from abuse.

By Margery Sly, Director of the Temple University Special Collections Research Center

image of four sad looking children, captioned "cases 19,463 and 19,464"

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